Archive for Television

Apr
04

Later, Dave

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It’s not easy to be a trailblazer when so many of the trails have already been blazed, but David Letterman somehow managed to blaze one anyway.

You may think that late night television was an already-mined resource by the time Letterman, 66, came along in 1982, hosting “Late Night with David Letterman” on NBC.

It’s true that TV at the witching hour was nothing new in 1982, having been first attempted some 30 years prior and being refined for 20 years by Johnny Carson when NBC gave Letterman a late night slot, following Carson’s “Tonight Show.”

But it turned out there was still plenty that Letterman found to do that not even the iconic Carson managed to discover.

Letterman announced today, somewhat shockingly during the taping of “The Late Show with David Letterman,” that 2015 will be the year of his retirement.

“This (retirement) means Paul (bandleader Shaffer) and I can finally get married,” Letterman said to a crowd that seemed to need the laugh to digest the news. But Letterman was serious—about the retirement part.

The longtime late night host said he had a phone conversation with CBS president Les Moonves not long before tonight’s taping and informed Moonves that 2015 would see the end of Letterman’s run on “The Late Show.”

Letterman was a morning loser when NBC gave him a mulligan—a big time mulligan—and put Letterman where his milieu clearly was, in late night.

Letterman’s morning show, which lasted just a few months in 1980, was a critical success of sorts (two Daytime Emmys) but a ratings disaster.

But he was back less than two years later, after midnight.

Where Letterman was able to forage—and where Carson either chose not to go or simply never thought of going—was in the mostly unexplored forest of pulling life’s non-celebrities into the party.

While Carson would occasionally interview folks like an old lady who collected potato chips that looked like people and animals, Johnny’s genius was in his gregarious chats with the famous and in his sketch comedy bits.

Letterman made 15-minute celebrities out of the every man with bits like “Stupid Pet Tricks” and “Stupid Human Tricks.” He also made Larry “Bud” Melman—real name Calvert DeForest, a little-known actor but his day job was working for a pharmaceutical company—famous with Larry Bud’s strangely humorous appearances, which many times made it seem like the joke was on Melman.

While Carson ventured into the crowd for bits like “Stump the Band,” Letterman took it one step further and blended crowd games with cameos from comedic actor Chris Elliott, with hilarious results.

And while Carson had Doc Severinsen and Tommy Newsome leading the “Tonight Show” band and functioning as occasional kibitzing partners, Letterman and Shaffer formed almost a tag-team comedy duo, chatting during the first 10 minutes of each show like they hadn’t spoken with each other all day.

It’s no coincidence that pretty much every late night show after Letterman’s employed a band with a leader who tried to be Paul Shaffer Light.

Sid Caesar and company started doing “Man on the Street” bits in the 1950s (something Carson never really did), but Letterman again turned it up a notch, beseeching the regular folks to partake in stunts and pull pranks on other unsuspecting folks—their colleagues, so to speak.

There are many other directions that Letterman took late night comedy and talk, but they are too numerous to mention here. Suffice it to say that while the genre had been discovered, Letterman took that block of clay and molded it.

“The time has come,” Letterman said today in announcing his retirement a year hence.

He wasn’t emotional, he wasn’t melancholy. He sounded like a man comfortable in his place and with his timing.

It was as if he was saying, “My job here is done.”

Which, it is.

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Feb
28

Oscar’s Weiners

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The distinctly debonair, razor-thin, legendary British actor was in the middle of his scripted bit of monologue when suddenly the crowd was in an uproar.

It was 1974, in the middle of an American craze that inexplicably had caught on ever-so-briefly, as so many other American crazes seem to do—-inexplicably.

This particular craze was called “streaking,” or running naked through a very public place. The nation’s ballparks and football stadiums, to name just a couple venues, were being overrun by those sans clothing, making their mad dashes.

And now the Academy Awards show was being interrupted by a streaker. He was male, even if just barely.

David Niven, startled by the sudden burst of hoots and howls from the audience, turned and looked to see what the commotion was all about. A streaker was moving behind him, across the stage, flashing the “peace” sign with his fingers.

Straying off script, Niven commented with spot-on—as they say in his country—comedic timing.

With typical British cool among chaos, Niven quipped, “Well, ladies and gentlemen, that was almost bound to happen… But isn’t it fascinating to think that probably the only laugh that man will ever get in his life is by stripping off and showing his shortcomings?”

Boom.

The Academy Awards—better known as The Oscars—are on this Sunday. Niven’s streaker incident was hardly the first time that the Awards were used to showcase one’s, ahem, views. Nor would it be the last.

Actors have used their acceptance speeches to push political agendas. Marlon Brando sent a supposed Native American (it’s been widely suspected that she was merely another actor, ironically) to refuse to accept his Best Actor Award for “Godfather”, purportedly in protest of the country’s treatment of American Indians.

George C. Scott declined his Best Actor Oscar for “Patton” because he didn’t like the political machinations of the Awards themselves. So he stayed home and watched a hockey game. True story.

Woody Allen made news by deliberately declining to attend the Oscars when “Annie Hall” was up for Best Picture, so he could keep a weekly clarinet-playing date in a New York club.

Those are just a few examples.

Others have put their foot in their mouths accidentally in acceptance of their awards, blurting out curse words or other untoward, awkward things. 

And who can forget Sally Field’s, “You LIKE me! You really LIKE me!”?

Personally, I enjoy watching the Oscars, but mainly to pick them apart. I guess I’m masochistic that way.

I hope to be entertained and laugh along the way, however. With Ellen DeGeneres hosting this year, the odds of that happening are good.

I also look forward to the montage of those in the film industry who we lost since the last Oscars. Invariably there’s someone about who my wife and I will look at each other and say, “(Fill in the blank) DIED? I didn’t know that!”

Even the montage has angered me in the past. The omission of Farrah Fawcett several years ago still rankles me.

Yes, the ceremony is notorious for running long and some of the speeches are boring and still others will make you squirm a little, but there are also some kick-ass ones as well.

Watching the Oscars is probably like sitting in the kitchen and eating ice cream right out of the carton, but it only comes once a year, so view with impunity.

Now…if they could only move it to Saturday night. The damn thing goes past midnight and people have to work the next day, don’t you know!

Oh, and here’s the famous Niven clip.

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Feb
25

Second City’s First Man of Comedy

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There’s a certain delicate symmetry when a person’s birth city and death city are the same.

Harold Ramis has such a line on his biography.

Born: November 21, 1944; Chicago, IL.

Died: February 24, 2014; Chicago, IL.

Ramis, the comedic actor/director who passed away Monday from a rare and painful vascular disease, was as Chicago as wind, deep dish pizza and crooked elections. If you cracked him open you’d have found a Cubs cap and a megaphone.

Ramis was always smirking. He had that twinkle in his eye, as if he knew something you didn’t. When it came to movie making and laugh making, he did.

Ramis was one of the leaders of a band of merry men and women who yukked it up at the original Second City improvisational theater group in Chicago, starting in the late-1960s. He was hardly alone when it came to finding fame later, but his imprint on American filmmaking puts him near the head of the class.

Ramis’s first role on the big screen saw him smirking all the way through 1981′s “Stripes,” the comedy he co-wrote and starred in with Bill Murray, directed by Ivan Reitman. Three years later, Ramis again took to the typewriter—this time with co-star Dan Aykroyd—and wrote “Ghostbusters.”

As the years went on, Ramis found more fortune staying behind the scenes, writing killer dialogue, physical comedy and directing the same.

Ramis’s body of work as a writer and/or director reads like so many film critics’ Top 25 lists of comedy vehicles.

“Caddyshack”; “National Lampoon’s Vacation”; “Groundhog Day”; “Analyze This”; “Analyze That”; “Meatballs”; “Stripes”; “Ghostbusters”; “The Office” (TV); “National Lampoon’s Animal House.”

That’s some serious comedy, right there. Iconic stuff.

And, of course, there was the transformation of Second City’s magic of improv from stage to small screen, when Ramis was a lead writer in the 1970s and ’80s on “SCTV,” produced out of Canada, when Toronto joined Chicago as a major contributor of raw talent that would go on to bigger and better things.

You’ve heard of John Candy, right?

Ramis spun his work off “SCTV” and made his foray into film, and we laughed and laughed.


Harold Ramis: 1944-2014

In the “I am not making this up” department, Ramis once worked in a mental institution in St. Louis for seven months.

“(The experience) prepared me well for when I went out towork with actors,” Ramis once said. “People laugh when I say that, but it was actually very good training. And not just with actors; it was good training for just living in the world. It’s knowing how to deal with people who might be reacting in a way that’s connected to anxiety or grief or fear or rage. As a director, you’re dealing with that constantly with actors.”

Sadly, the man who brought us to tears of laughter and split our sides so often, had a painful and debilitating end as he battled his rare vascular disease.

Vasculitis develops when the body’s immune system turns on its network of veins and arteries. Blood vessels become inflamed, restricting the flow of blood or cutting it off entirely, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Ramis was first diagnosed a few years ago.

Coming from someone who should know, having worn both hats, Harold Ramis once gave his analysis of the roles of writer and director.

“I always claim that the writer has done 90 percent of the director’s work.”

However you choose to slice it, there’s no number crunching needed with this: Harold Ramis made people laugh.

Today, Chicago is a little less windy, the deep dish pizza a little colder. Even the Cubs are worse off.

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Feb
12

Hail Caesar

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Television was pretty much an extension of the theater when Sid Caesar first started showing up in the living rooms of America in the late-1940s.

The performances were shown to audiences much like you would see something live on stage—few if any close-ups, archaic blocking, everything horizontal. Not that you couldn’t deliver the goods shooting that way—just look at any “Honeymooners” episode.

But it was the work ethic that also translated from theater to early television. The shows may have been in front of cameras, but the players performed like it was Broadway—live and often.

Sid Caesar is gone. The year, just 43 days old, has already been unkind. We’ve lost legendary animator Arthur Rankin, Philip Seymour Hoffman and, on Monday, Shirley Temple Black.

Caesar was 91 when he slipped away today in California after a short illness.

Caesar lit it up every week, for 90 minutes no less, in “Your Show of Shows,” which was basically television’s first foray into sketch comedy.

Every Saturday night, from 9:00-10:30, Caesar, Imogene Coca, Carl Reiner and Howard Morris—plus several regular guest stars, put on what was essentially was a live variety show—39 weeks a year.

It was, truthfully, the original “Saturday Night Live.”

“YSOS” won a couple of Emmy Awards along the way, but its lasting imprint has nothing to do with hardware. The early-1950s was a great time to be on television if you had any bit of pioneer in you and cared to blaze some trails. And Caesar and his band of merry men (and women) did plenty of blazing in the four years that “YSOS” was on the air.

Writing for Sid Caesar was as important as performing with him. If you wanted a career in TV as a writer, you wanted to write for Caesar. He was television’s doorman for aspiring writers.

Reiner called upon his years of writing and performing on “YSOS” as inspiration for “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” which set many scenes in the writing office of Buddy Sorrell, Sally Rogers and Rob Petrie, who wrote for the bombastic, hard-to-please TV star Alan Brady (Reiner).

Sid Caesar was widely known in the 1950s as the best comedian in the world—TV, radio, movies, you name it. He had the rubber face, the gangly body and the New York-soaked voice that always went well with comedy.

It was Caesar and fellow comic Ernie Kovacs who looked at television as a block of clay with which to play, like children in a sandbox. Maybe the better analogy is pigs in slop, for the comedy of Caesar and Kovacs was hardly spic and span—in terms of props, physicality and creativity.

In “YSOS,” Caesar and Coca could be anyone from a squabbling married couple to an artist and his muse to two bums on the street. Always, they were scenery chewers but most importantly, always they were funny.

“Television had its share of comedy geniuses,” Los Angeles Times television critic Howard Rosenberg wrote in 1994. “Yet arguably none has been as uniquely gifted and inventive as Caesar. Watching him perform, you just know light bulbs are popping continuously in his brain.”

Caesar wasn’t as prolific on the big screen, though he did do memorable turns in films such as “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World” and Mel Brooks’ “History of the World: Part I.”

But movies weren’t Caesar’s milieu. He was a performer who needed the rush of going in front of a live audience, being beamed live into people’s homes, eschewing multiple takes, cue cards and TelePrompTers, which weren’t even around when Caesar came on the scene—not that he would have used them anyway.

It truly was the Golden Age of Television in Sid Caesar’s day. Lucille Ball, Jackie Gleason, Reiner and Kovacs were lock step with Caesar when it came to television comedy—all pioneers in their own way and all making their mark in this new medium that supplanted radio as the family’s watering hole of entertainment.

Caesar’s shtick included his famous “double talk” bits, in which he’d shamelessly combine languages, dialects and jargon with hilarious results. Thankfully, YouTube functions as our own personal Museum of Broadcasting History, so we can fire up a Caesar sketch 24/7.

There’s great irony in one of Sid Caesar’s quotes, coming as it did from a pioneering genius such as himself.

“The guy who invented the first wheel was an idiot,” he once said. “The guy who invented the other three, he was a genius.”

That makes for some laughs, but Caesar invented the first wheel of sketch comedy. There was nothing idiotic about that.

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Feb
07

Jay’s Walking

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How will TV historians judge Jay Leno?

The legacy of Johnny Carson was already filed and ready for perusal long before the amateur magician from Nebraska hung up his microphone in May, 1992 after nearly 30 years of hosting The Tonight Show.

Carson’s imprint on television history—forget just Tonight—was plainly indelible about 10 years into his run, when the show moved from New York to Burbank. So the next 20 years were spent building on a legacy that saw the unofficial launch of countless stand-up comedians’ careers and the cementing of various other entertainers into the public’s consciousness.

That, plus Carson’s own star grew so bright that we were blinded by it when he walked away from the studio and into retirement.

But what about Leno, whose final show as Tonight’s host for 22 years was recorded on Thursday?

When Carson took the mantle in 1962, the show was eight years old and had been hosted by Steve Allen (1954-57) and Jack Paar (1957-62). Television was still in the midst of carving a swathe in pop culture. It was more than a year before the medium grew up fully with its hour-by-hour coverage of the Kennedy assassination.

Carson had the advantage of being able to use the show as his own piece of modeling clay, because when Allen and Paar hosted it, not nearly as many people were watching.

This was not the case with Leno, who took over in 1992 in a much stickier fashion, having been the winner in a two-horse race for the show’s reins with David Letterman.

So there were more than a few crossed eyes watching Tonightwhen Leno took over. Many viewers were in one of two camps—Leno’s or Letterman’s. Those in the latter, no doubt, wouldn’t have been unhappy if Leno crashed and burned.

Carson’s fingerprints were all over everything when he hosted Tonight, from the opening monologue to the iconic interview moments to the Mighty Carson Art Players and to the audience participation games.

Leno’s iconic guest moments were far fewer, and it’s uncertain how many stand-up careers he truly launched. Leno’s imprint pretty much was reduced to the jokes in the monologue, but some of that wasn’t his fault, because Carson’s team were like gold miners who didn’t leave Leno’s people much to discover.

Still, hosting a show for 22 years is nothing to sneeze at. The ratings may have dipped at times, but to be fair, the viewing pie was sliced into many more pieces during Leno’s run than when Carson ruled late night.

Sadly, Leno will be largely remembered for two things when it comes to Tonight: the mini-controversy in the way he took over (the tiff with Letterman) and the way he regained the show from Conan O’Brien after a brief foray into the 10:00 p.m. time slot.

It’s unfortunate, because those who had long moved on from the way Leno’s run started, were either moved to be against him yet again when the O’Brien mess happened, or if they were too young to recall the bumpy beginning, framed O’Brien as victim.

Neither cast Leno in a good light, obviously.

If the body of Leno’s work on Tonight is to be judged solely on what happened on camera, then he acquitted himself well, even if his humor was hardly cutting edge. If the off-camera nonsense is taken into account as well, then Jay Leno will be forever known as a polarizing character whose agenda was perhaps less than gracious at times—an opportunist who should never have come back once O’Brien was given Tonight.

Regardless, Jimmy Fallon is on the clock. It’s unlikely that he’ll do the show for anywhere near Leno’s 22 years. And that, in of itself, is at least one feather in Jay’s cap.

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Jan
31

Moving On Up

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After 27 years of delivering the weather to TV viewers, Chuck Gaidica is going to be working a little closer to the source.

Gaidica, who’s been telling us how to dress since 1987 on WDIV-TV (channel 4), is leaving that position in August for the ministry.

He’ll be joining the Oak Pointe Church in Novi as its pastor of world outreach.

Leaving broadcast news for the private sector is hardly unprecedented. Nor is leaving it for the public sector; note how many television and radio journalists have joined political administrations.

But it’s not too often when one moves from the TV studio to the pulpit. A cynic would argue that speaking into a camera to millions every night is the perfect prep job for what Gaidica is about to embark upon.

“I think maybe we all would like God to send us a message in skywriting but that didn’t happen,” Gaidica told the Detroit Free Press. “God leads people with whispers and nudges.”

Gaidica’s decision was hardly made in haste or on a whim.

The 55-year-old native of Chicago has often leaned on his spiritual self, and told the Free Press that the decision to move from in front of the camera to the church was six years in the making.

From the Free Press story:

Gaidica said he spent a month living in Jerusalem last year to study for a master’s degree in ministry leadership. Now that he has earned the advanced degree from Grand Rapids Theological Seminary of Cornerstone University, he says he’s ready to devote more of his time to the huge Oak Pointe Church. The congregation of 3,000 is part of a coalition of 40 southeast Michigan churches.

Chuck Gaidica arrived at WDIV in 1987, and he hasn’t changed all that much. That is to say, he showed up clean-shaven, good looking and cheerful, and he leaves television pretty much the same way. Maybe it takes a bit more pancake make-up to prep him these days, but he’s one who the camera has continued to love over the years.

The new guy at channel 4 will be Ben Bailey, whose resume includes nine years of being the morning meteorologist for WJBK-TV (channel 2).

It’s selling Gaidica short to say that he’s just been a “weatherman” lo these many years.

He’s won three local Emmy Awards and has been a regular on WDIV’s Thanksgiving Day Parade coverage for years. No one knows Santa Claus like Chuck Gaidica.

Gaidica has worked on other TV specials and has been a radio host on WNIC-FM (100.3).

But it’s been at 6:00 and 11:00 where Gaidica has made his living, telling us what’s going on outside, since we’re all too lazy to poke our faces out the window.

I met Gaidica back in the 1990s, when I was running the local programming department for Barden Cablevision in Detroit. Our studio was channel 4′s old one, located next door to WDIV’s current studios/offices. Gaidica dropped by to check out the old digs. I found him to be very personable and gracious.

Gaidica, in switching from TV weather to the ministry, goes from a job where you can be wrong all the time and not be held accountable, to one where his personal impact will be almost constant.

“Servant, shepherd, if that’s what God wants me to do,” Gaidica said of his new vocation. “I’m going to miss leaving the anchor desk a lot, but this was a really great time to make this change.”

Sure. He’s still young, clearly has the passion, and with his being on TV in Detroit for the past 27 years, that kind of name and face recognition certainly can’t hurt Gaidica and Oak Pointe Church’s cause.

“(Gaidica)’s going to touch everything for us outside the four walls,”says Oak Pointe senior pastor Bob Shirock. “When you get somebody like Chuck, you don’t want to just stick him in an office and have him prepare sermons.”

Heaven forbid!

Good luck, Chuck. It’s been fun having you give us false hope with your meteorology reports for the past 27 years!

America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade won’t be the same, either. Maybe you’ll come back and do that every year?

Run that one past the Big Guy, won’t you?

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Jan
16

So Long, Professor and Manager

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Between them, Russell Johnson and Dave Madden are known, pretty much, for two television characters.

That doesn’t mean they were flashes in the pan—it just means that the folks they played made an impression that was almost indelible.

Johnson was The Professor on “Gilligan’s Island.” Madden played the “Partridge Family”‘s manager, Reuben Kinkaid.

Both passed away today. Johnson was 89; Madden was 82.

As is typical when lightning strikes and you find yourself in a role that is enormously popular, Johnson was a little known character actor when he signed on to play the Professor on “Gilligan” in 1964. His life, of course, was then changed forever.

In Madden’s case, he first showed up on the small screen as one of the ensemble members of “Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In,” which debuted in 1967. But the real money and notoriety came a few years later, when he joined the cast of “The Partridge Family,” playing the exasperated manager to the performing family, led by matriarch Shirley Jones.

Where Russell Johnson’s character was perhaps the most cerebral on his show, Madden was no fool on his, but he was often the foil and the butt of the sassy humor of son Danny (played by Danny Bonaduce).

Johnson’s Professor tried to ground his co-island inhabitants, while Madden’s Kinkaid just tried to survive each day managing the Partridges.

Madden also did a lot of commercials, his pop-eyed, disarming looks and distinctive voice lending themselves well to the world of advertising and voice-over work.

But despite the more variety in Madden’s career versus Johnson’s, it’s doubtless that an overwhelming number of viewers who are old enough to remember, will correctly identify Reuben Kinkaid with Dave Madden, just as they attach Russell Johnson to the Professor.

The Professor did have a name, by the way—Roy Hinkley. Use that to win a nice bet in a bar someday.

Johnson was a veteran of TV shows, ranging from science fiction to westerns, before he got the role of Professor Hinkley on “Gilligan.” And then, in three years, Johnson pretty much erased his career, before and after “Gilligan,” from the minds of TV viewers everywhere.

Johnson was the Professor, period.

Even Johnson was hard-pressed to figure out why “Gilligan’s Island”—a nonsensical show about castaways who somehow always seem to have what they need to survive yet who cannot gain rescue—was so popular and has such long-lasting appeal.

“It’s a phenomenon that we don’t really understand,” Johnson once said of his and his cast mates’ amazement.

Madden, forever dressed in his rumpled suit while managing the Partridges, was much more blunt and candid about playing Reuben Kinkaid.

“What did I like about playing Reuben? The money! Any TV actor who answers differently is probably lying. Face it, it’s not exactly Shakespeare,” Madden said in a 2008 interview.

No, not Shakespeare, but I bet more people can recall episodes of “Gilligan’s Island” and “The Partridge Family” than can recite from “Hamlet.”

Not saying that’s good or bad. Just, true.

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Nov
29

Holy Bidding, Batman!!

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It was one of the coolest things I ever saw on television, and I was just a wee lad of four years old.

Oh, how I loved to watch the Batmobile in the Adam West-ravaged, 1960s TV series, “Batman,” leave the Bat Cave.

First, there was the firing of the ignition, which always included the stock shot of flames shooting from the Batmobile’s exhaust. That was cool, too.

But there was something about the black, souped-up 1955 Lincoln Futura zooming from the cave that captivated me.

That’s because there was this small guard rail that would flip down, enabling the Batmobile to pass through. THAT was the coolest thing.

Some things just grab us and don’t let go, particularly from our youth.

There was something about that guard rail flipping down that I thought was just so awesome in its simple auspiciousness.

That image comes to mind as I read that the Batmobile is going up for auction. It’ll happen on January 19, 2013, at the Barrett-Jackson auction house in Scottsdale, AZ.

The Batmobile is a 19-foot long, black work of art—maybe the coolest vehicle ever, something that Henry Ford could never have conceived in his wildest imagination.

So how much will it fetch in auction?

No one is saying, which is appropriate, because mystery has always been such a large part of the Batman character, from the comic books to the “Dark Knight” movies.

George Barris and his original Batmobile creation


The original Batmobile (there have been some replicas) was created by George Barris, a Los Angeles-based car customizer. I don’t know if Barris was given a blueprint, a clay model, or was just left to his own devices, but regardless, he created a masterpiece. The machine (it seems too small to call it a car) has been kept in marvelous condition over the years.

There was so much for a small boy to love about the Batmobile. The flaming exhaust, the bubble top, the siren, the wings, etc., all captivated. And, come on—it was 19 feet long!

Thanks to YouTube, here’s a 29-second clip of the boys racing to the Batmobile and leaving the cave. Watch for the guard rail flipping down just before the machine hits the highway!

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Nov
28

Two Minus a Half Men

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I’m not sure which is more troubling—that Angus T. Jones has come out against his own show, “Two and a Half Men,” as being “filth,” or that it took the young man so many years to come to that conclusion.

Jones, 19, who has been part of the one-joke show for its entire nine-year run, blasted “Men” in a video recorded in October but that has just recently popped up on YouTube.

Appearing with a mostly shaved head and looking like either a hostage or a cult member, Jones says to the camera, “I’m on ‘Two and a Half Men’ and I don’t want to be on it…Please stop watching it and filling your head with filth,” Jones adds. “Do some research on the effects of television and your brain, and I promise you you’ll have a decision to make when it comes to television and especially with what you watch on television.”

Thanks for the advice, Angus, but I don’t think you need to do much research to come to the conclusion that “Men” is not exactly a TV show that is brimming with highbrow humor.

For nine years (the past two with Ashton Kutcher as Jon Cryer and Jones’ co-star; the first seven were with the manic Charlie Sheen), “Men” has managed to crank out episode after episode on a premise that would appear to have a short shelf life.

Jones plays Cryer’s son. Cryer is divorced and for the first seven years he shared an apartment with his boozing, womanizing brother Charlie (Sheen, in a real stretch). Cryer has a contentious relationship with his ex-wife, which, when Jones was younger, was played for laughs as Jones was the feuding ex-spouses’ pawn.

Kutcher joined the show two seasons ago as suicidal billionaire Walden Schmidt, who was saved from his death march into the Pacific Ocean because it was too cold. Schmidt then wound up at the late Charlie Harper’s home and taken in by Cryer’s character, Alan.

So where is all the “filth” (Jones’s word) that Angus T. Jones is talking about?

Well, pretty much everywhere.


Angus T. Jones

“Men” shoves sex in your face, plus juvenile bathroom humor; the hilarity of divorce when kids are involved; alcoholism; one-night stands; teen apathy; and other bad character traits of various guest stars and secondary players.

Other than that, it’s clean and wholesome fun.

Jones’s tirade would appear to be his way of ending his contract, though there has been no comment yet from Warner Brothers studios, the studio where “Men” is shot, about their child star’s outburst.

When a celebrity spouts off such religious righteousness, it is often an indicator that he/she is about to walk away from the business. But it’s far too early to determine whether Jones’ pious-filled beat down of “Men” is an indictment of just that show, or of the business in general.

Maybe we’ll see Jones turn up somewhere else on television, a medium not known for its dignity.

The kid is right about “Men,” of course. Even if he is a bit of a slow learner.

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Nov
23

The Question Is…(Beats Me)

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When I first started watching “Jeopardy,” the dollar values were $10-50 for the first round and $20-100 for Double Jeopardy. The answers were revealed by stagehands pulling cards backstage. The only lights were the ones illuminating the stage. Don Pardo was the show announcer. Art Fleming was the host, and he didn’t have all sorts of foreign words to over-pronounce. No one won trips or tens of thousands of dollars. The categories included such as “Potent Potables” and “Potpourri.”

But the game was still damned hard to play, and needed legitimate intellect in order to succeed. “Jeopardy” was never about spinning wheels or drawing cards or shouting “Big Money! Big Money!” or “No Whammies!” It was never about dumb luck or bouncing up and down on stage like a contestant on “Let’s Make a Deal.”

“Jeopardy” is the one game show that can make me feel intellectually bankrupt. Yet it’s that very feeling that draws me to it, like an insect to a porch light.

Not that I am an avid viewer. I don’t stop what I’m doing at 7:30 p.m. to flip on channel 4 to catch Alex Trebek, that crusty old Canadian, delight in pronouncing various languages’ words. But when I do happen to tune in, when the stars and the moon align properly, I find every episode to be challenging and fun.

There’s a small joy I take in every “Jeopardy” question I can correctly ask. Each one is a mini victory. I consider myself a pretty good trivia guy, but the stuff these “Jeopardy” people know isn’t trivia, it’s a bunch of mini college theses.

There hasn’t been an episode of “Jeopardy” yet, where I haven’t mused aloud, “How do these people know this stuff, anyway?”

How does one study for an appearance on the show? How do you bone up on subject matter that can range from 18th Century European Literature to the history of minerals?

Yet Merv Griffin’s creation (he came up with the idea of providing questions for answers, he said, while on a plane) has been featuring eggheads in six different decades now, all asking questions involving subject matter that I have no idea about how they have acquired the knowledge.

I’m a sucker for Final Jeopardy.

If I don’t see any other part of the show, I want to see Final Jeopardy. And not just because of the iconic music that’s played while the contestants scribble their questions.

It’s the ultimate challenge. They give you the category then take a commercial break, giving you the requisite two minutes to wonder what on Earth the answer could be. Then Trebek comes back and reads the answer. The music is cued and plays. Everyone—the contestants in the studio and those of us at home—have about 60 seconds to come up with the correct question.

There’s no better feeling of accomplishment than correctly identifying the Final Jeopardy question. It can more than make up for the previous 22 minutes of feeling like an idiot, which those eggheads make me feel like.

I caught the show last night, while at my mother’s house for Thanksgiving. As usual, I was correct a pathetically low percentage of the time. As usual, I felt like an intellectual midget.

And, as usual, I can’t wait to try it again.

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